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Standing Up for Climate Change (and the Present Progressive Tense)

by | October 9, 2019

Tara climate change banner

Ecosystems are collapsing.

—Greta Thunberg

Did any of your students join the recent climate strikes? Are your learners interested in talking about climate change? How do they feel about using the term "climate crisis"?

We have a new biography lesson on youth spokesperson Greta Thunberg (Low Int – Int), who has been getting a lot of media attention lately (both positive and negative). In this lesson, students learn a bit of history about the youth movement and review vocabulary related to protests. This lesson also includes a mini‑lesson and review of the present progressive tense. This tense is useful for talking about climate change, an action that is happening right now.

The Present Progressive

After you try the Greta Thunberg lesson, you can show this video. It features students being interviewed about why climate change is so important to today's youth. Ask your students to watch for use of the present progressive tense. Every time they hear someone use this tense in the video, have them stand up!

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